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Peace cranes sent from art program to Hiroshima

%E2%80%9CWe+got+to+make+a+wish+like+they+%5BSadako%5D+did+and+write+it+in+the+crane%2C%E2%80%9D+seventh-grader%2C+Heidi+Porter%2C+said.
“We got to make a wish like they [Sadako] did and write it in the crane,” seventh-grader, Heidi Porter, said.

“We got to make a wish like they [Sadako] did and write it in the crane,” seventh-grader, Heidi Porter, said.

-photo by india ingham, graphics editor

-photo by india ingham, graphics editor

“We got to make a wish like they [Sadako] did and write it in the crane,” seventh-grader, Heidi Porter, said.

LeopardLife Elaina Johnson, staff writer; India Ingham, Graphics Editor; and Molly Martin, WSMS TV News

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0nD08Rhuis
Molly Martin - WSMS Video Spot News

Some say peace begins with a person.  Here at Willow Springs, peace began with classrooms of art students who for more than two weeks created numerous, colorful paper cranes that draped and adorned the halls as a project led by art teacher Jenny Slaver. These cranes were later sent to Hiroshima, Japan on May 5 for the final celebration of Golden Week, Children’s Day.

According to an art teacher Slaver, the inspiration for the paper crane project came from a story about a girl in Japan. The girl was named Sadako, and she is the main reason why so many worldwide send cranes to Hiroshima for Children’s Day.

“They [the cranes] are going to Hiroshima, Japan for a few reasons. The first reason is whenever we got inspiration for this project we read the story about Sadako and the thousand paper cranes. Sadako is a young girl who lived in Hiroshima, Japan when the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and later developed leukemia from the radiation from the atomic bomb attack,” Slaver said.

To make the paper crane assignment more connected to art, the art students painted value paintings of their paper cranes with oil paint. According to Slaver, the art students did a unit on origami before they were given the assignment to make a thousand cranes altogether.  “It took about two-and-a-half weeks [to make all the paper cranes],” Slaver said.

Before the paper was folded into a crane, students said that they were able to write a wish on the paper just like Sadako. Even though there were many cranes sent to Japan, there are still multiple cranes hanging in the halls and in the art room. According to multiple sources, the crane is a symbol of health, healing, and truth in Japan.

“We got to make a wish like they [Sadako] did and write it in the crane,” seventh-grader, Heidi Porter, said.

The tradition of making a thousand cranes for Children’s Day in Japan goes outside of Slaver’s classroom. People all over the world get together to make thousands of cranes to send to Japan. According to http://www.city.hiroshima.lg.jp/shimin/heiwa/crane.html, approximately 10 million cranes are offered each year before the Children’s Peace Monument.

“So fast forward, Sadako actually tried to fold a thousand paper cranes because she wished to get well. Sadly, her dream wasn’t realized and she ended up passing away,” Slaver said.

“But as a symbol, people all over the world started folding paper cranes to symbolize their message and wish for peace for the whole world, so then the whole world peace paper crane wish was born. And now every year on May 5, it’s a national holiday called Children’s Day in Japan and they celebrate peace and wanting children to be safe all around the world. So on May 5, all these paper cranes get sent to Hiroshima, Japan to be displayed on the Children’s Peace Monument there and so our stuff is all going to be displayed on that Children’s Peace Day Monument.”

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Peace cranes sent from art program to Hiroshima