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Music to the judges’ ears

The+Treble+Bass+choir+performs+their+acapella+piece+Vive+L%E2%80%99amour.
The Treble Bass choir performs their acapella piece Vive L’amour.

The Treble Bass choir performs their acapella piece Vive L’amour.

-photo by olivia lauter, photo editor

-photo by olivia lauter, photo editor

The Treble Bass choir performs their acapella piece Vive L’amour.

LeopardLife Anthony Morgello, Staff Writer

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The musical UIL competition, one of the various ratings of skill and proficiency in the musical electives, has been the focus for the three musical fine arts departments for five months. The event determines the rating and quality of the band, choir, or orchestra.

UIL is a time for all fine arts to showcase their hard work, and get rewarded in the form of placements. The competitions take place in the spring for theatre, band, choir, and orchestra. The rating is done on a scale from one to four, with four being the highest score.

The band competition works in a way were they will receive three songs in advance to practice. They will perform these until finished and move onto the sight-reading portion, the band directors will have a few minutes to rehearse the song with the band until they are on their own to be judged.  

“All of the Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band members compete in UIL Competition. The Band UIL Concert and Sight-reading Contest is equivalent to the STAAR exam for other subjects,” WSMS band teacher, Martha Ball, said. “Bands are evaluated on their abilities to perform with: correct tone, intonation, balance, dynamic contrasts, etc. Bands are first evaluated during their stage performance against those criteria.”

After the stage performance, the students are then asked to perform a song which they have never seen before for the sight-reading session.

“There are two parts in the competition, the three songs we have already prepared for, then we do the sight reading competition. Our director will usually have a few minutes to work with us then we have to play for two minutes,” seventh-grade percussionist, Arya Raju, said.

The orchestra’s UIL works almost identically to the band’s. They start out with a stage performance, and then they move on to the sight reading room. Each orchestra came away with the highest score in their stage performance, but only one managed to get the highest score in the sight-reading room.

“All of the orchestras did pretty good in my opinion,” eighth-grader, Joeley Hedgcoxe, said. “Every single orchestra got the highest possible score for their stage performance, and I think it’s really cool how we all managed to do that. I think next year they will perform even better, and that amazes me.”

However, choir UIL works differently compared to band. Instead of being judged against a rubric, they compete against other schools directly. Choir’s performance gained them first place in every single part of the UIL performance, beating out many other schools.

OAP works similarly to Choir UIL. The students were graded based off how well the students followed the rulebook and their acting skills. Their performance earned them eight awards, including one for the bus driver’s outstanding parking skills.

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Music to the judges’ ears